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Fall Wedding Wildflower Bouquets


My dear friend Laura was married at the end of September. I offered to help out by arranging her wedding flowers, a task I was a little nervous about because, as we all know, flower options become a bit more limited the farther you get into the Fall season. However, Laura was incredibly easygoing about the flowers and pretty much gave me the criteria of “I just want something pretty.”

[![](jekyll_uploads/2012/11/Wildflower-Wedding-6-575x382.jpg "Wildflower Wedding (6)")](http://www.sweetpeonies.com/2012/11/fall-wedding-wildflower-bouquets/wildflower-wedding-6/) Photo by: SweetPeonies

The wedding was held at a little local church on a college campus, with a river running along one side–idyllic right? The reception was held just down the road at Meredith Valley Farms, this venue has some of the most beautiful views of the Tennessee hills I have ever seen. The weather was a bit stormy throughout the afternoon but you would have never known by looking at the joy on the bride and groom’s faces as well as the sheer happiness on the faces of all those in attendance.

[![](jekyll_uploads/2012/11/Wildflower-wedding-4-575x382.jpg "Wildflower wedding (4)")](http://www.sweetpeonies.com/2012/11/fall-wedding-wildflower-bouquets/wildflower-wedding-4/) Photo by: SweetPeonies

Because of the simple and natural elements involved in this wedding, we decided to make the bouquets and arrangements very natural and free–everything you might think of when it comes to wildflowers. All of the flowers came from Linda’s farm, Aunt Willies Wildflowers.

[![](jekyll_uploads/2012/11/Wildflower-wedding-3.jpg "Wildflower wedding (3)")](http://www.sweetpeonies.com/2012/11/fall-wedding-wildflower-bouquets/wildflower-wedding-3/) Photo by: SweetPeonies

Hannah Bader, a friend of mine and local photographer, served as their wedding photographer and snapped a couple of photos for me at the service. Hannah’s photography includes weddings, portraits, and events. She approaches her photography from a photo-journalistic/environmental portraiture approach. The following are just a few of the photos she took downstairs as I was finishing some final bouquet details (more photos to come).

[![](jekyll_uploads/2012/11/Wildflower-Wedding-575x359.jpg "Wildflower Wedding")](http://www.sweetpeonies.com/2012/11/fall-wedding-wildflower-bouquets/wildflower-wedding/) Photo by: Hannah Bader

If you live in East Tennessee and are looking for a great photographer, be sure to check out Hannah’s portfolio on facebook (under Hannah Bader), or contact her by phone at (423)-342-0255 or by email at bader.hannah@gmail.com.

[![](jekyll_uploads/2012/11/IMG_6501edit-575x383.jpg "Wildflower Wedding")](http://www.sweetpeonies.com/2012/11/fall-wedding-wildflower-bouquets/img_6501edit/) Photo by: Hannah Bader

See corsages from this wedding at Farmstyle Wedding Corsage.

Here are a few more photos from Hannah.

[![](jekyll_uploads/2012/11/Wildflower-Wedding-Hannah-Bader-2-575x383.jpg "Wildflower Wedding Hannah Bader (2)")](http://www.sweetpeonies.com/2012/11/fall-wedding-wildflower-bouquets/wildflower-wedding-hannah-bader-2/) Photo by: Hannah Bader
[![](jekyll_uploads/2012/11/Wildflower-Wedding-Hannah-Bader-3-575x862.jpg "Wildflower Wedding Hannah Bader (3)")](http://www.sweetpeonies.com/2012/11/fall-wedding-wildflower-bouquets/wildflower-wedding-hannah-bader-3/) Photo by: Hannah Bader
[![](jekyll_uploads/2012/11/Wildflower-Wedding-Hannah-Bader-1-575x383.jpg "Wildflower Wedding Hannah Bader (1)")](http://www.sweetpeonies.com/2012/11/fall-wedding-wildflower-bouquets/wildflower-wedding-hannah-bader-1/) Photo by: Hannah Bader

Fall Wedding Wildflower Bouquets


My dear friend Laura was married at the end of September. I offered to help out by arranging her wedding flowers, a task I was a little nervous about because, as we all know, flower options become a bit more limited the farther you get into the Fall season. However, Laura was incredibly easygoing about the flowers and pretty much gave me the criteria of “I just want something pretty.”

[![](jekyll_uploads/2012/11/Wildflower-Wedding-6-575x382.jpg "Wildflower Wedding (6)")](http://www.sweetpeonies.com/2012/11/fall-wedding-wildflower-bouquets/wildflower-wedding-6/) Photo by: SweetPeonies

The wedding was held at a little local church on a college campus, with a river running along one side–idyllic right? The reception was held just down the road at Meredith Valley Farms, this venue has some of the most beautiful views of the Tennessee hills I have ever seen. The weather was a bit stormy throughout the afternoon but you would have never known by looking at the joy on the bride and groom’s faces as well as the sheer happiness on the faces of all those in attendance.

[![](jekyll_uploads/2012/11/Wildflower-wedding-4-575x382.jpg "Wildflower wedding (4)")](http://www.sweetpeonies.com/2012/11/fall-wedding-wildflower-bouquets/wildflower-wedding-4/) Photo by: SweetPeonies

Because of the simple and natural elements involved in this wedding, we decided to make the bouquets and arrangements very natural and free–everything you might think of when it comes to wildflowers. All of the flowers came from Linda’s farm, Aunt Willies Wildflowers.

[![](jekyll_uploads/2012/11/Wildflower-wedding-3.jpg "Wildflower wedding (3)")](http://www.sweetpeonies.com/2012/11/fall-wedding-wildflower-bouquets/wildflower-wedding-3/) Photo by: SweetPeonies

Hannah Bader, a friend of mine and local photographer, served as their wedding photographer and snapped a couple of photos for me at the service. Hannah’s photography includes weddings, portraits, and events. She approaches her photography from a photo-journalistic/environmental portraiture approach. The following are just a few of the photos she took downstairs as I was finishing some final bouquet details (more photos to come).

[![](jekyll_uploads/2012/11/Wildflower-Wedding-575x359.jpg "Wildflower Wedding")](http://www.sweetpeonies.com/2012/11/fall-wedding-wildflower-bouquets/wildflower-wedding/) Photo by: Hannah Bader

If you live in East Tennessee and are looking for a great photographer, be sure to check out Hannah’s portfolio on facebook (under Hannah Bader), or contact her by phone at (423)-342-0255 or by email at bader.hannah@gmail.com.

[![](jekyll_uploads/2012/11/IMG_6501edit-575x383.jpg "Wildflower Wedding")](http://www.sweetpeonies.com/2012/11/fall-wedding-wildflower-bouquets/img_6501edit/) Photo by: Hannah Bader

See corsages from this wedding at Farmstyle Wedding Corsage.

Here are a few more photos from Hannah.

[![](jekyll_uploads/2012/11/Wildflower-Wedding-Hannah-Bader-2-575x383.jpg "Wildflower Wedding Hannah Bader (2)")](http://www.sweetpeonies.com/2012/11/fall-wedding-wildflower-bouquets/wildflower-wedding-hannah-bader-2/) Photo by: Hannah Bader
[![](jekyll_uploads/2012/11/Wildflower-Wedding-Hannah-Bader-3-575x862.jpg "Wildflower Wedding Hannah Bader (3)")](http://www.sweetpeonies.com/2012/11/fall-wedding-wildflower-bouquets/wildflower-wedding-hannah-bader-3/) Photo by: Hannah Bader
[![](jekyll_uploads/2012/11/Wildflower-Wedding-Hannah-Bader-1-575x383.jpg "Wildflower Wedding Hannah Bader (1)")](http://www.sweetpeonies.com/2012/11/fall-wedding-wildflower-bouquets/wildflower-wedding-hannah-bader-1/) Photo by: Hannah Bader

Purple & Orange Wedding


Today was my last farm day for the year. I’m always sad when summer comes to an end but with Fall just around the corner the workload at the farm dwindles down and really, it’s just in time for me to head back to classes. After seven years and three degree changes I am finally beginning my last year. Hooray! Next week I will head back to class and will also be starting a new job. Such a busy month. I am so excited to get started with the year and finish up this chapter of my life but right now, feeling sad to say goodbye to summer and all the beauty to be found out on the farm.

Today Linda and I worked on a rather unique wedding. The bride wanted purple and orange–not a request we are used to getting, however, the bouquets were both fun and beautiful. The groom’s boutonniere was purple and the groomsmen had orange. Like many of us, the happy couple also enjoy a good tasting beer and thought it would be fun to include hops in their bouts. Once again, so fun!

purple & orange wedding

purple & orange wedding

purple & orange wedding

purple & orange wedding

I hope you’ve enjoyed these pictures and found a little bit of inspiration. I never would have thought to use purple and orange for wedding colors but after putting these together, I’m a believer! I so loved arranging this fun wedding and wish the happy couple all the best.


Ribbon Braid Bouquet DIY


Wedding bouquets are by far my favorite flower piece to arrange. There are multiple factors to consider when planning a bridal bouquet. Many brides put all their creativity and thought into the flower type and completely forget to adorn the bouquet handle. Adding a bit of glam to the bouquet handle is simple and can make a huge impact. One of my favorite handle wrap techniques is the classic braid adorned with pearl corsage pins. This is the braid technique I used on last week’s bridal brooch bouquet? This simple classic braid is simple, elegant and fail-safe.

bridal brooch bouquet

Preparation:

Arrange your flowers and tie with a rubber band close to the neck. Cover the rubber band with green floral tape, then proceed down the stems as far as you want your braid to run. Leave at least 1 inch of the stems exposed at the bottom. If you want to cover the entire bottom of the stems as well, you need to wait until the day of or find some really great ribbon that won’t fall out of place after being soaked in water all night.

Choose your ribbon, a medium width is best. Place your bouquet on it’s side with the “front” facing you (the side that will not face the bride). If you are braiding up the majority of the stems, use 1 entire roll of ribbon. You may end up cutting some off at the end but it is better than running short and this technique uses much more ribbon than you might think.

brooch bouquet and braid

The Braid:

Step #1: Starting at the bottom of your stems, wrap the ribbon around the back of the stem bundle and even up the two sides of ribbon. Hold the ribbons up toward you and taut.

Step #2: Cross the ribbons, one in front of the other two times. You are basically switching the ribbon from your left hand to your right and back again. You should have a twisted tangle of ribbon now. Now pull the ribbons to their separate sides, this should move something resembling a knot down toward the stems.

Step #3: Cross your ribbons around the back of the stems to switch their sides. Repeat the crossing in front by once again crossing the two strands around each other twice then pulling the strands away from each other to move the knot down.

Step #4: As you tighten each “knot,” try to keep them in line with one another and make sure you are overlapping the ribbon all the way up the stems so there are no gaps.

Step #5: Continue to braid your ribbon to the neck of the flowers and finish the braid by either tying a knot or a bow. If you have extra ribbon, measure the strands to the end of your bouquet stems and cut each at an angle.

Step #6: Using short corsage pins, place one at the base of each knot to dress up your braid. Push the pins in and up so they don’t poke out the other side of the stem bundle and stab the bride.

bridesmaid ribbon mini braidWhile the bride may enjoy having a full braid that covers the entire length of the stems, bridesmaids often opt for the mini-braid which covers only a portion of the bouquet handle. This technique (seen in the picture at right) follows the same steps but it is only necessary to wrap a small portion of the stem with floral tape–just enough to cover the rubber band.

I hope these pictures are helpful. Ribbon braiding really is a very simple and quick process. As always, please let me know if you have any questions.


Silver & Gold Brooch Bouquet


Remember those beautiful brooches I mentioned in my sneak peak bridal bouquet post last week? Well, I have finally managed to pull all of that gorgeous jewelry together into one stunning bridal brooch bouquet.

bridal brooch bouquet

This being my first attempt at a brooch bouquet, I am quite pleased with the finished product. I cannot take all of the credit however, the lovely bride did an absolutely fantastic job of picking out all of the brooches for her bouquet. At first, I wasn’t sure how it was all going to come together as she had a wide array of metals and gemstones included in the mix, but her creative instincts paid off and the jewelry came together beautifully.

The hardest part of this bouquet (which I didn’t have to do) would definitely be the wiring of the brooches. In order to make one of these bouquets you need to take floral wire or some other sturdy wire and loop it around the clasps on each individual brooch. The tricky part is wiring the brooches well enough that they will remain upright and sturdy. The more time you take to wire the brooches carefully, the easier it will be to assemble your bouquet. You may also want to use hot glue underneath the brooch where you attach the wire to help secure the wire more sturdily to the clasp.

Take three strong hydrangeas. We used fake ones which I highly recommend if you are making a full bouquet like the one pictured. This bouquet is very heavy so you will need the heavy weight of fake flowers to support all of the brooches. If you prefer a bouquet with intermittent brooches, you can use live hydrangea and add other live flowers into the mix to help fill holes and support the jewelry.

Cut your fake hydrangea stems the length that you want your bouquet to be. I use a large mason jar as my guide, placing the flowers inside you want the bottom edge of the flowers to rest gently on the top edge of the jar (or whatever vase you will use at the reception).

brooch bouquet

Wrap your hydrangea stems together with floral tape (no need to wrap all the way down, just secure them together).

Now comes the fun part. Poke each of your wired brooches through the tops of the hydrangea petals until they rest gently on top of your flowers. Continue to add brooches one by one until you have covered the tops and sides of your hydrangeas.

Once all the brooches are in place, carefully wrap all wire stems together using floral tape. At this point, the bouquet is very heavy so you may want to ask a friend to hold it as you wrap.

bridalbroochbraid

Once the stems are wrapped all the way to the bottom. Grab your ribbon and cover the floral tape with whichever ribbon wrap style you prefer. I will post a tutorial for the classic braid shown in these pictures next Friday.

I hope you’ve found these instructions helpful. As always let me know if you have any questions or if I need to clarify any steps.


Succulent Boutonniere How To


I am constantly writing to you about buying flowers locally and arranging them yourself for special events or weddings but what about those specialty pieces like corsages and boutonnieres? Can you also make these yourself? The answer is “yes & yes” and I’m ready to show you how.

blue gray boutonniere how to

This little boutonniere is incredibly simple to make and uses items that are hardy enough to remain upright even when out of water overnight. When we make boutonnieres for weddings on the farm, they are usually assembled the afternoon prior to the wedding, at the same time we arrange centerpieces and bouquets. If you know what to use, this is not too far ahead of the event to assemble the boutonniere. Once you have finished assembling all your bouts, simply store in the refrigerator until the big event.

When choosing stems for your bout, be sure to choose ones that are hardy. This bout uses Ivy as the backing, dusty miller, blue thistle, dianthus and a small succulent.

Assembly:

Step 1: Find a flat surface and lay out one leaf of Ivy. Lay one leaf of Dusty Miller on top.

Step 2: Now add a small piece of blue thistle on top of the Dusty Miller and slightly left of center.

blue gray boutonniere how to

Step 3: Lay the Dianthus to the right of the thistle.

blue gray boutonniere how to

Step 4: Push the succulent up under the Dianthus and slightly to the right of center. You should position the succulent so that it is sort of supporting the Dianthus, that way, even if it decides to wilt it will be supported and go unnoticed.

blue gray boutonniere how to

Step 5: Now you want to add a smaller Ivy leaf to the front of the bout, right underneath the succulent giving it a sort of clam-like appearance (sorry I forgot this picture, but look at the finished product up top and you will see what I mean).

Step 6: Pinch the stems together right underneath the heads of the stems and cut the stems and varying lengths. This is helpful for those of you who want to cover the stems with ribbon, it makes a gradual thickening as you up the stems toward the flowers.

blue gray boutonniere how to

Step 7: While holding the stems tightly with one hand, grab your roll of florist tape and begin to wrap the stems at the neck of the bout. If you just want a simple bout without ribbon, continue to wrap the stems all the way down with the florist tape (ribbon wrap tutorial to come).

blue gray boutonniere how to

There you have it, one very simple boutonniere crash course. Don’t forget to be creative with your materials–there are an endless possibilities when making your bout. One of my all-time favorite items to use is dried wheat or barley for a vintage look.

blue gray boutonniere how to


Sweet Pink Bouquet + Herbs


For this week’s Friday at the Farm, we had our first bridal luncheon of the summer. In fact, the only bridal luncheon on the books this year. For those of you who are unfamiliar with this event, Linda gives our brides the option of having a bridal luncheon the day before their wedding. This luncheon allows the bride and bridesmaids to relax on the farm for a couple of hours and basically play with flowers. Sounds nice, right?!

pink bridesmaid bouquet

We teach the ladies how to arrange their bouquets for the big day and, of course, help them as needed. Some brides and bridesmaids are quick to catch on to the techniques involved in hand-held-bouquet-making, others prefer to have us shape the bulk of their arrangement–either way, the bridal luncheons are fun for all.

pink bridesmaid bouquet

Linda and I also arranged market bouquets following the luncheon festivities. Here is one of my favorite arrangements from the day. I also found a fantastic new picture spot on the farm–love this lighting.

Arrangement: sweet peas, decorative sage, dianthus, mountain mint (smells SO good), oregano, goose neck


Wedding + Flower Girl Headband


This past week, the flower farm crew learned to stretch our imaginations a little bit farther than usual. This was the first time we were asked to arrange two weddings on the same day, and to make it a bit more interesting…two vastly different color palettes and settings.

Wedding #1: flowy, wild & bright; different flowers for each bouquet, outdoor wedding
Flowers: grasses, mint, sunflowers, larkspur, black-eyed susans, lilies, bells of ireland, feverfew, campanula, and more.

Wedding #2: neat, rounded bouquets, specific color pallet: periwinkle and raspberry, continuity across bouquets& arrangements
Flowers: blue, white and pink hydrangea (we even spray-painted a few–yes, this is an option), hot pink roses, snapdragons, holly, feverfew

We also made a grand total of 23 boutonnieres this week (trust me, that’s a lot).

Flower Girl Headband Bright Colors

Although vastly different in flowers and setting, both weddings were quite beautiful. My absolute favorite part of arranging these weddings, however, was the flower girl headbands. And, of course, I never took a finished photo of the pieces (grr). However, if you will excuse the sad, unfinished photos I can show you the headbands minus the ribbon.

I picked up these plastic headbands with a thin layer of foam on top in Walmart’s craft section for $1.17. To attach the flowers, I simply arranged two small grouping of flowers and greens in my hand and wrapped the stems with florist tape, as you would a boutonniere.

Next, I placed the larger grouping higher on the side of the headband, stem-ends facing down (toward your ear) and attached it to the headband by wrapping the stems to the band with florist tape. Then I took the smaller grouping and attached it to the band with stems facing up (toward the top of your head) and sort-of wedged under the flowers of the first grouping. So, the two flower bunches are facing each other (you can see the shape we are going for in the photo of Kristin’s yellow headband).

Flower Girl headband muted colors

The last step, not shown here, is to wrap the ribbon of your choosing around the rest of the head band. I made a small knot under the edge of the flowers on each side (so it can’t be seen) and continued to wrap down toward the ends of the headband where I tied off the ribbon with another small knot.

I know that sounds a bit confusing but once you start the process, it comes pretty naturally. The brightly-colored headband is the one I made, the muted yellow one was made by my good friend Kristin who keeps me sane on those days I can’t seem to find a rhythm to my arranging. Don’t we all need one of those friends? I hope this has been an enjoyable read for you. Best of luck!


Bold & Bright Wedding Arrangement


Hello friends, Jack and I just got back from a mini-vacation to see the family–at least some of them. So, to make up for missing Floral Friday, here is a little post on a beautiful and bold wedding arrangement made for a bright wedding two weeks ago.

Seriously, isn’t this arrangement gorgeous?!

Bright Wedding Flower Arrangement

I can’t get over how simple and breathtaking these flowers are, and so simple. Some of my favorite flowers are the ones that grow in mixed colors, you see this effect with flowers like Dahlias, which no one can deny they are beautiful. However, there is something about the pure colors–especially pure and bold like this arrangement.

This arrangement began in a pastel-colored pitcher but we discovered white was the only way to go. The flowers are gorgeous on their own and a colored pitcher didn’t make as big of a statement. Here’s another picture for you.

Stems:

Pink Peonies
Magenta Snapdragons
White Snapdragons
Blue Delphinium
Sunflowers
Hosta Leaves
Bells of Ireland
Ornamental Grasses

Arrangement:

This arrangement starts out a bit different from what I normally recommend. There is not much filler used so I would start with your tall stems that are used most, in this case the snapdragons. Next, add in the little bit of filler–Bells of Ireland (the green things that look like bells–just in case you needed help with that).

Bright Wedding Flower Arrangement

Now we need to focus on pulling the eye downward. Start by placing pink peonies low in the arrangement, nearly to the vase rim. The sunflowers have large stems so I would cut those lower than the snaps but higher than the peonies. Make sure you don’t cut them all the exact same height, you want these to be varied throughout the middle third of the arrangement height. Add these next since they will fill large holes and take up much of the vase space.

Now you can add the delicate-stemmed delphinium for beautiful pops of bluish-purple color. Finally add the Hosta leaves around the rim of the vase, as if cradling the peonies. Hosta leaves give the eye an end point for the arrangement.


Coral Peony Bridal Bouquet


A few weeks ago I had the privilege of helping Linda with flower arrangements for a vintage wedding. If you haven’t figured it out before, it seems the go-to flower for vintage is the beautiful peony. And really, who would argue with that choice? The peony is absolutely exquisite in all colors but this coral color is by far my favorite. I could look at it for hours. Really? Not even kidding.

Here’s another look, in case you too, can’t stop staring.

Alrighty then, tearing eyes away, closing mouth, moving on…

The bridal bouquet was made mainly with white and coral peonies, white stock, yellow, white & peach ranunculus, chartreuse-colored physocarpis, and bells of Ireland.

Bouquets are different than arrangements in styling order. With arrangements you typically want to start by placing your filler since that will take up more of the vase space. With bouquets however, filler is much more scarce so you actually begin with your flowers, and usually the bulkier flowers first to provide support to the smaller stems.

So, can you guess which flower we start with here? That’s right, the peonies! Group a few peonies in the middle, then add a white stock in between each peony. Then add a few Bells of Ireland stems around the edges of the peonies and stocks, follow with an outer layer of peonies in the open spaces.

As you move toward the outer edges of your bouquet, make sure you are continuing to push the outer edges upward instead of letting them fall low. With bridal and bridesmaid bouquets you want to see all of the flowers at the top, not lose them down underneath at the spot where you would hold the bouquet, make sense?

Alright, now all that’s left is filling in the spaces and adding a few pops of color and filler. This bouquet has Phisocarpus leaves placed sporadically throughout for a bit of added filler and little peach, white, and yellow Ranunculus for added color. Hold the bouquet lower on the stems as you add flowers. This allows the bouquet to sit loosely giving you plenty of wiggle room for adding stems in last minute or even pulling a few out.

And of course, if you like the look, add Hosta leaves around the very bottom to create a collar. This gives the eye an end point and keeps the focus on the flowers above the collar instead of trailing off into nothingness.


Guest Post: DIY Bridal Headband


I am very excited to announce that The Kitchen Curtains will now be featuring guest posts! In the past few weeks, I have recruited, if not begged, a few talented individuals to share their crafting, cooking, baking, blogging, and photography skills with you, the reader. I am very excited about these articles and so incredibly grateful to these individuals for taking time out of their busy schedules to contribute to my blog. I am always looking for creative ideas, so please feel free to email me with your own guest post submission ideas, pictures, or articles.

Because I am SO stinkin’ excited about our first guest post, I won’t make you wait any longer. This talented individual runs her very own photography business, with hubby, in the Salem, Oregon area (my home). I have known her since Jr. High and have seen her flourish into a gorgeous, successful, classy, Godly woman. I hold the deepest respect for her and am so excited to introduce you to her today. So, without further ado, here is Kira of Kira Noble Photography. After reading, be sure to head over to her blog and also check out her website for some exquisite wedding, engagement, and family photographs.

 

Hello! I am so excited to be guest blogging over here at The Kitchen Curtains! Here’s a little DIY project that I whipped up for my best friend Amy. She is getting married at the end of this month and I made a headband for her to wear during her wedding reception. She is planning on wearing a veil during the ceremony and then we’ll put this DIY headband in before she and the new hubby dance the night away. I didn’t spend a dime on this project because I happened to have all the materials on hand. That said, most of these items can be found at places like Joanns or Michaels. Okay, so here’s what you’ll need.

1. A length of ribbon or lace that will fit around your head. (I cut the lace after measuring it to the nape of the neck. We are just going to use bobby pins to secure the ends into Amy’s hair instead of tying it off.)
2. 7-8 small rectangular pieces of lace or fabric. I used scraps of swiss dot lace from a previous project.
3. Package of pearl or clear beads.
4. Needle and thread. Be sure to use thread that will match the color of the lace or fabric.
5. Scissors

1. I marked the spot on the headband where I wanted the flowers to go with a pin.

2. Next, I started making the small flowers for the headband. Start with one of the small rectangular strips.

3. Accordion fold the strip. (I usually only got 3-4 folds per strip, but that will vary depending on the length of your rectangular strips.)

4. Thread your needle and tie a knot at the end of thread. Then insert the need through the center of the folded piece of lace or fabric several times until it is secure. Do not tie off or cut the thread yet.

5. A pearl bead will serve as the center of the flower, so next thread the bead through the needle.

6. Let the bead rest in the center of the flower and run the needle and thread back through the lace several times until the bead is secure.

7. Then tie off the thread. Next cut around the edges of the flower to make them round. You can get creative with the cutting around the edges to yield different looking petals.

8.  Next place the flower on the headband and secure it by running your needle and thread near the center of the flower several times.

After securing about 8 flowers to the headband, I filled in some of the space between flowers by sewing in pearl beads. There is no right or wrong in DIY land. That’s all folks! What do you think? Stay tuned for a close up photo of how this headband looked on Amy, and if you try this DIY out I’d love to see your end product!


Munsey Wedding


The past two weekends have been full of wedding frenzy. Two weekends ago, I helped out a friend by coordinating her special day and this past weekend, Kristin and I hosted a bridal luncheon for a sweet bride out at the farm. Linda was on a family vacation so it was up to us to plan the luncheon, cater, and put together the arrangements for the wedding. So, although busy, it has been a fun two weeks. I’m now thinking my nursing degree may be the financial backing for an event planning/flower arranging/catering hobby, if indeed you can call that a “hobby.” Now I just need some clients.

Anyways, back to the wedding…the ceremony was held at Munsey United Methodist Church, which has one of the most exquisite sanctuaries (see below). The bride was very laid back (which we always appreciate) and was happy to use whatever was blooming on the farm for the arrangements. Lucky for her, there are lots and lots of beautiful flowers blooming on the farm right now.

We tied shepherd’s hooks to the ends of the aisles with raffia and hung ball jars on each filled with a variety of wildflowers. The sanctuary is very large and to line every row with flowers, although exquisite, would have been very expensive. Instead, we adorned every other aisle for the first 10 rows. I was worried the flowers might get lost in the sanctuary but was pleasantly surprised with the finished result.

Here’s a close-up of one of our ball jars for you.

The front of the sanctuary has a set of stairs, followed by a choir loft and then a back altar area, all very intricate. In order to not have the main arrangements overshadowed, they had to be big, bold, and beautiful. I think we succeeded!

Here’s a close-up of the main arrangements. These are compiled of sunflowers, lisianthus, feathered black-eyed susans and various grasses.

At the bridal luncheon on Friday, I helped our bride, Anna, put together her bouquet. The final arrangement consisted of dahlias, zinnias, limelight hydrangeas, and lisianthus. The green collar around the outside is a bubby bush, which is also commonly referred to as either sweet shrub or carolina allspice.

I also braided ribbon down the stem of her bouquet.

Kristin and I used lisianthus buds, frosted explosion, ivy leaves, and blue thistle to make a few varieties of boutonnieres.

Ball Jar Arrangements:

Shasta Daisies, Dahlias, Green Zinnias, Pink Lisianthus

Zinnias and Sunflowers

Pink Zinnia, Lisianthus, Ageratum

This wedding was simple and elegant, a combination I love. As you can see, wedding or event flowers do not have to match to go together and be beautiful. You can mix a wide variety of flowers, fillers, and color and still end up with a unified presentation.

I hope these wedding pictures give you a bit of inspiration today. Happy arranging!